“Bridget Jones on speed” The Guardian UK

“Brings to mind Kathy Lette and Jilly Cooper” Mail on Sunday UK

“Lightening-fast comic twists.” Elle

“Ab Fab meets Sex In The City!” The Telegraph UK

 “A Clever chick-lit look at the highlife Brit style” Dec 01 2005 USA TODAY ( Sex With The Ex)

“Makes This Life look tame by comparison.” Independent on Sunday

“A spirited page turner that is high on humour.” Company

“Full of high octane court room drama, lashings of comedy and crackling with un-zipped one liners.” BookChitChats

“Readers will no doubt enjoy this glimpse into sophisticated London nightlife.” American Library Association

“O’Connell’s debut is a delightful, lighthearted romp around Hollywood and the world of reality television.” — Booklist USA on The Sex Was Great But. . .

“A sure footed romp, spiced with spot-on bad-taste humour a la Kathy Lette and the Ab Fab team, and some excellent characterisation. Bravo!” Who Weekly

“A right Royal read.” The Mayfair Times

“….Verdict: Funny exposé of It-girlschool life.” – Elle Girl UK

“O’Connell’s debut is a delightful, lighthearted romp around Hollywood and the world of reality television.” American Library Association 

“Evelyn delivers some superbly sassy one-liners in this hilarious romp. Definitely a book for the modern girl.” CHAT

“A right royal read!” – Cosmo Girl UK

“Bridget Jones for the early teen set.” – Washington Post USA

Budding Anglophiles ….will soak up the flood of upper-class British culture  in this book” – WASHINGTON COUNTY COOPERATIVE LIBRARY SERVICES 

“Outrageously funny and a serious contender for the teen chick-lit throne.” – Claudia Mody, THE BOOKSELLER

“It is sure to have fans of the previous novels rolling on the floor laughing their royal crowns off.” SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL, USA

A tale of celebrity, catastrophe & ‘The Rules’ – Manhattan Style.- Publishing News

‘Wickedly Funny’ – Publishing News

“Frothy and fast-paced” Publishers Weekly

“Just when you thought you had seen it all on Sex In The City, Tyne O’Connell wades in with this tale of wild child English columnist on the loose in New York” Marie Claire

“Devout chick-lit lovers could do worse than this breezy romance,” Kirkus Reviews

“Fun for middle school and younger high school” Book Review

School Librarian
June 22, 2011
A timely teen-girl read with some very funny set-pieces is Tyne O’Connell’s A Royal Match, a combination of two books, ‘Pulling Princes’  and ‘Stealing Princes’. Calypso, an American girl at an English boarding school, catches the fancy of Freddie, prince and heir:
COPYRIGHT 2010 The School Library Association.

The School Library Association
“Calypso, an American girl at an English boarding school, catches the fancy of Freddie, prince and heir.”

Chick lit fans will appreciate this lighthearted Hollywood romp between the “Princess” and the Pauper. …  the story line has a serious undertone involving the homeless that works well because of Leo contrasts the two worlds, minutes apart yet zillions of lifestyles away. Thus Leo undergoes a physical makeover, but the shallowest person on the planet is actually the one that changes as he and his misfit associates touch the untouchable heart of HollyHarriet Klausner

ALAN Review
By,Elle Wolterbeek
Pulling Princes by Tyne O’Connell
O’Connell has created a tale that appeals to many adolescent girls. Calypso, the main character, attends an elite boarding school in England while her parents live in Hollywood. As an American attending the school, Calypso has a difficult time fitting in. When Calypso returns for another year of schooling, she finds out she is rooming with Star, her best friend, and Georgina, one of the popular girls who berates Calypso on a regular basis.
In a fencing match against Eades, the male counterpart to the girls’ school, Calypso is up against Prince Freddie, next in line to the throne of England. After the match Freddie and Calypso talk, and Freddie becomes romantically interested in Calypso. As Freddie and Calypso’s relationship progresses, Calypso’s life at school becomes increasingly more difficult.
Girls of all ages can relate to Calypso as she ventures out of the sheltered world she has created for herself and begins her first real relationship, deals with the difficulties involved in remaining true to herself, and recognizes the complexity of relationships and the strains relationships can create.

 

LATEST ACCESSORY THE INDEPENDENT LONDON dec 11/1997 Evelyn Hornton is still a respected member of one of the classiest set of chambers in town. She earns enough to pay a mortgage on some seriously hip loft space in Clerkenwell – though not enough to pay off her ever-mounting Harvey Nichols charge card. In fact the only fly in Evelyn’s ointment is the presence of a stalker – a man in a Littlewoods mac who has taken to following her down St John Street and urinating in shop doorways.  THE INDEPENDENT LONDON dec 11/1997


Kliatt
November 1, 2004 | Claire Rosser,
O’CONNELL, Tyne. Pulling princes; the Calypso chronicles.

This is a first YA novel by an experienced British author best known for adult comedy novels. O’Connell once attended a Catholic boarding school in England, as do her own three children, and so she is comfortable describing the life Calypso leads at just such a school. Calypso is actually an American, sent to St. Augustine’s by her California parents; as the story begins she still feels like a misfit, even after several years at the place. Now 14 years old, she has a new roommate and her life changes. She and her one true friend. Star (daughter of a rock star), are sharing a room with The Honorable Georgina Castle Orpington, and she and Star finally are learning what it is like to connect with the British aristocracy, for better and for worse. Calypso also meets Freddie, a royal prince, in a fencing lesson with the nearby boys’ school. They strike up a flirtation that escalates into an incident that gets into all the British tabloids.
But this doesn’t give you any idea of just how outrageously funny this story is: O’Connell writes just about everything for laughs. She satirizes the rich girls and their obsessions. She is kind toward the nuns who run the school, who truly are intelligent, tolerant, and loving in their dealings with their wacky students. The girls hide vodka in their Body Shop bottles, they smoke and then spray Febreze around to cover the smell, they swear and plot against one another; they use their intelligence and creativity in madcap ways, and they actually do know how to be loyal friends. This book (could it be first of a series?) fits right in with other funny British teenage stories, but I think it has carved out its own niche in a posh boarding school setting.

 

AUDIOBOOK REVIEW
O’Connell, Tyne. Stealing Princes.
In this sequel to Pulling Princes, the students at an exclusive British boarding school compete for attention, friends, and boys. Fourteen-year-old California girl Calypso, something of a misfit among the wealthy British upper-class girls, can’t decide which supremely fit boy she prefers. Will it be Freddie, a prince of royal blood, or Billy, an older charmer who once rescued her from an attacking guard dog? She must also cope with an evil new roommate, Honey, who has a vicious tongue, detests Calypso as a colonial upstart, and meddles destructively in other people’s lives. Calypso’s heart is set on attending the La Fiesta Ball, which is to be the highlight of her school year, and obsesses constantly about the event and who might be her escort. Unfortunately, all her rosy dreams crash, and she behaves stupidly and selfishly toward those she believes have deceived her. After she becomes sufficiently contrite, the book ends in an improbable, Cinderella-like blaze of glory. The dialog is full of “darlings” and “bitches,” and the plot involves hi-jinks such as vodka hidden in a teddy bear and a moonlight sneak-out to smoke and drink in the woods. Drug use and graphic sex don’t figure in it. Lots of text messaging goes on. Actress Talasko immerses herself perfectly in the teenage characters and keeps the story charging along from one Calypso crisis to the next. Since many of the terms used are British colloquialisms, a glossary is included at the end. It should be at the beginning. Fun for middle school and younger high school girls. Pat Dole, Richmond, VA

School Librarian
June 22, 2011
A timely teen-girl read with some very funny set-pieces is Tyne O’Connell’s A Royal Match, a combination of two books, ‘Pulling Princes’ (04 and ‘Stealing Princes’  Calypso, an American girl at an English boarding school, catches the fancy of Freddie, prince and heir.

CONTEMPORARY AUTHORS
In Sex with the Ex public-relations professional Lola is a beautiful woman with many friends and a great job representing a successful private club called Posh House. Nevertheless, when her ex-husband and two old boyfriends attend a party at the club, Lola comes to the realization that she lacks one important thing to make her life complete: a man. She finds that she is still attracted to her ex-husband, Richard, despite his many problems, which include cocaine abuse, little money, and a girlfriend he has no qualms about deceiving. Despite her better judgment and against the advice of her friends, Lola begins to see Richard again. “Devout chick-lit lovers could do worse than this breezy romance,” remarked a Kirkus Reviews critic.
The author has also written a series of novels for the younger set featuring the teenager Calypso Kelly. The first book in the series, Pulling Princes, finds the American-born Calypso in a British boarding school and striving to leave her outsider status behind and become part of the popular set. Her goal seems to be in reach until classmate Holly becomes jealous when Calypso garners the attention of Prince Freddie, who is second in line to the British throne. A Publishers Weekly contributor called the effort “frothy and fast-paced,” while Claire Rosser, writing in Kliatt, commented that the story is “outrageously funny.” In Stealing Princes, O’Connell continues the adventures of Calypso, who this time must deal with a new room-mate who may be out to steal her boyfriend, Prince Freddie. Booklist contributor Cindy Welch observed that the “boarding school setup provides some fun.”
O’Connell told CA: “When I was seven, I was consumed by the bittersweet hilarity of Nancy Mitford’s fictional works. When I discovered that the fictional worlds she created were actually referencing her own life, I was completely captivated. I knew that was what I wanted to do: make my life fictional and my fiction alive. As I travelled the world as a professional gambler, my only outlet was writing. Then, when my first book was published by Headline UK, I folded on my last poker hand and focused on the writing.
“My life experiences and my children inform and influence all my work. Wherever I am in the world, I wake up, sit at my laptop with four double espressos and write. My family wanders in and out as I work and I carry on conversations. Around ten or twelve of an evening I like to go out, mostly to private members clubs where I meet with friends. I am usually in bed with an improving book by three or four in the morning. I don’t sleep more than five hours in a twenty-four-hour period. When I was a gambler I seemed to need to sleep all the time.
“The most surprising thing I have learned as a writer is that it is almost possible to live in a parallel world while writing a book—without completely losing your mind. It also surprises me that other people are interested in what is, essentially, a very solitary and lonely art. I do like my ‘Calypso Chronicle’ series, which are a genuflection to my three children as well as my own childhood. But am also madly fond of Sex with the Ex because the story is based on the most painful time of my own life and yet it makes me laugh whenever I read it.
“All my books deal with the darkest, most awful, most embarrassing aspects of my own life, but somehow when I write them down, they come out as comedy, which I suppose is a bit worrying. It’s rather cathartic to find yourself laughing at someone else’s embarrassing shambolic life and I hope that’s what my writing offers to the reader.”

American Library Association
Holly Klein, the host of the celebrity makeover show MakeMeOver thinks she has big problems. She’s just been voted “Most Shallow Female Celebrity” in a glossy magazine’s reader poll and is fretting about the future of her career when her purse is snatched. Leo, out panhandling with a friend because he has nothing better to do, retrieves her bag but gets hurt in the process. Holly invites him to her house to get him cleaned up, and when Nancy, the producer of her show, sees him, she gets a brilliant idea. Holly can do a makeover on Leo and have all Hollywood believing he’s a celebrity. Leo agrees in order to be close to Holly, and it isn’t long before the two give in to their mutual attraction. But Holly refuses to be with Leo anywhere but in the privacy of her pool house, and the makeover show ultimately threatens to come between them. O’Connell’s debut is a delightful, lighthearted romp around Hollywood and the world of reality television. Kristine Huntley

PUBLISHING NEWS
A tale of celebrity, catastrophe & ‘The Rules’ – Manhattan Style.
When Wild-Child London Journalist Anna encounters drop-dead gorgeous Mark in the Tribeca Grill restroom, she can hardly believe her luck – and no more can she weeks later, when he seems to have become a permanent fixture in her life. But there’s nothing like a pregnancy scare to rock the boat!
Enter Topsy, Anna’s larger-than-life, celebrity feminist mother, with her chat-show philosophy on love. In her view, there is only one answer to Anna’s baby dilemma. But what is Mark hiding from Anna, and do the two of them have a future together?
A tale of celebrity, catastrophe & ‘The Rules’ – Manhattan Style. ‘Wickedly Funny’ – 

MARIE CLAIRE
‘Just when you thought you had seen it all on Sex In The City, Tyne O’Connell wades in with this tale of wild child English columnist on the loose in New York who hitches up with a cautious American lawyer. Mark has thus far managed to resist the siren call of love, but Anna, with her spray on dress and a shoe-box Everest in the bedroom, has got him completely hooked. And then there is a pregnancy scare. Who is going to run first – Mark or Anna?’ – Marie Claire

Audiobook Review
O’CONNELL, Tyne. Stealing princes. (The Calypso Chronicles.) Read by Nicky Talacko. 7 cds. 8.25 Hrs. Bolinda Audio.
In this sequel to Pulling Princes, the students at an exclusive British boarding school compete for attention, friends, and boys. Fourteen-year-old California girl Calypso, something of a misfit among the wealthy British upper-class girls, can’t decide which supremely fit boy she prefers. Will it be Freddie, a prince of royal blood, or Billy, an older charmer who once rescued her from an attacking guard dog? She must also cope with an evil new roommate, Honey, who has a vicious tongue, detests Calypso as a colonial upstart, and meddles destructively in other people’s lives. Calypso’s heart is set on attending the La Fiesta Ball, which is to be the highlight of her school year, and obsesses constantly about the event and who might be her escort. Unfortunately, all her rosy dreams crash, and she behaves stupidly and selfishly toward those she believes have deceived her. After she becomes sufficiently contrite, the book ends in an improbable, Cinderella-like blaze of glory. The dialog is full of “darlings” and “bitches,” and the plot involves hi-jinks such as vodka hidden in a teddy bear and a moonlight sneak-out to smoke and drink in the woods. Drug use and graphic sex don’t figure in it. Lots of text messaging goes on. Actress Talasko immerses herself perfectly in the teenage characters and keeps the story charging along from one Calypso crisis to the next. Since many of the terms used are British colloquialisms, a glossary is included at the end. It should be at the beginning. Fun for middle school and younger high school girls. Pat Dole, Richmond, VA
O’Connell, Tyne. Pulling princes; the Calypso chronicles.(Brief Article)(Book Review)

The Washington Post
December 19, 2004 — Elizabeth Ward
Pulling Princes: The Calypso Chronicles, by Tyne O’Connell
All right, this isn’t Jane Eyre. It’s more like Bridget Jones for the early teen set: a helium-light spoof of two literary conventions, the Valley Girl romp and the English girls’ school intrigue. Calypso, the 14-year-old-daughter of mildly struggling Hollywood writers, is sent to a “madly posh” convent boarding school across the pond on the say-so of her British mom. As the story opens, she’s on her way back after Easter break, determined to finally a) make it into “the cool pod of girls” and b) start pulling seriously fit boys. (Don’t worry, there’s a glossary.) She ends up pulling a real prince. At one point, a debate breaks out about what “satirical” means. “It’s sort of a piss-take, isn’t it?” the girls muse. “A tease really. Only cleverly done and fun, not nasty.” Exactly.
— Elizabeth Ward